Author Interview: Lochlan Bloom Reply

Lochlan-bloom-author-writerThis week we’ve been speaking with Lochlan Bloom, whose debut novel The Wave was published earlier this year. The Wave is one of three novels published by Dead Ink via their Arts Council-funded project PublishingTheUnderground.
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Lochlan has written for BBC Radio, Litro Magazine, Slant MagazinePorcelain Film, IronBox Films, The Metropolist, EIU,  H+ Magazine and Palladium Magazine amongst others.

Is The Wave your first work to be published? Do you write short fiction as well as longer form?

The Wave is my first full length novel but a few of pieces of my shorter fiction have been  published before.

Last year, Australian publisher InShort published one of my stories The Open Cage as a stand-alone chapbook and Philistine Press also published a short collection of stories Ambi & Anspi and other stories.

My short novella Trade is also available from Createspace.

What gave you the idea to write the novel and what gave you the idea to blend metafiction, historical fiction and screenplay? Tell us a bit about The Wave.

The finished novel came together from a number of different places  but the nucleus of the idea centered around the character μ and his slow dislocation from reality.

From the start, I wanted to create something that questioned the process of reading and explored this idea of a fictional character crossing over from the real to the unreal while balancing that with real life characters and screenplay elements.

The title itself comes from the concept of a guiding wave, put forward by David Bohm, to describe quantum phenomena. Its a hidden variable theory and suggests that, at a fundamental level, all the interactions in the universe are intimately connected. As such the guiding wave concept tied in with the connections between story and reality I was exploring in the book and this idea of a hidden or implicate order.

How did it feel once the book was finally finished?

It was great to finish the first draft of The Wave but I get a single eureka moment when a piece of writing is ‘done’. Often, the first  draft of a section just fits and there is nothing to change but then again for other sections the writing process is more as Borges described it when he said – ‘I do not write, I rewrite’. Getting that balance is the key to getting something that works I think.

More…

Featured Market: Lighthouse Reply

This week’s featured market is Lighthouse.

Lighthouse is a new journal published quarterly to give space and support to new talent. They look to publish the best short fiction and poetry emerging from the UK writing scene. Lighthouse is part of Gatehouse Press, an award winning publishing house for new fiction and poetry. Lighthouse is run on a voluntary basis by a team of editors

Here’s a quick look at their prose guidelines:

  • For short fiction, we will not normally be able to print submissions of more than 7000 words. We welcome the submission of shorter prose forms, such as flash fiction and micro-fiction. Please do not send us extracts from longer works, such as chapters from novels, unless they are able to stand alone as complete pieces.

Full submission guidelines here.

Lighthouse is a high quality print publication with a range of talented and experienced editors that want to see work from new writers. What more could you ask for? Get submitting, and good luck!

 

Featured Market: Wasafiri Reply

This week’s featured market is Wasafiri.

Wasafiri is Britain’s premier magazine for international contemporary writing. Published quarterly, it has established a distinctive reputation for promoting work by new and established voices across the globe.

Wasafiri Issue 85

Here’s an intro to their submission guidelines.

  • Fiction submissions should be no longer than 6000 words in length and previously unpublished.
  • Work should be submitted as a Word document or equivalent (no pdfs please, and do not paste your short story into the body of an email).
  • Your name should not appear anywhere on the manuscript. Instead, your name and contact details should be listed in a covering letter/email.

Full guidelines can be seen here.

Wasifiri is an established magazine with a great reputation. Placing a story with them would be a brilliant achievement, and will give your work an international audience – so get to it!

Featured Market: Neon Reply

This week our featured market is Neon – an independent UK-based literary magazine which publishes a selection of fiction and poetry three times each year. Each edition combines magical realism with horror, slipstream and literary writings. Neon have a particular taste for the surreal and strange.

The digital edition of the magazine is available for free online, and the print issue can be shipped to anywhere in the world.

Neon have very free submission guidelines. Here’s what they ask for:

There is no set word limit, but please send enough work to cover approximately three pages of the magazine. This could be one story, a couple of flash fictions, or several poems. I prefer darker pieces, especially those with an element of the surreal or speculative. I am open to reading anything, however, and am often surprised by pieces that don’t fall into these categories.

You can see their full guidelines on how to submit here.

 

 

Featured Market: Bombay Gin Reply

This week’s featured market is Bombay Gin.

 

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Started in 1974, Bombay Gin is the literary journal of The Jack Kerouac School of Disembodied Poetics—co-founded by Allen Ginsberg and Anne Waldman—at Naropa University in Boulder, Colorado. Edited by department faculty, students and staff, Bombay Gin publishes innovative poetry, prose and hybrid texts as well as art, translations and interviews. Emerging from the “Outrider” or left-hand lineage, which operates outside the cultural mainstream, Bombay Gin honours a heritage of powerful scholarship and counter-poetics through the publication of work that challenges the boundaries of language, form, and genre.

Bombay Gin have published the likes of Charles Bukowski and William Burroughs in their 46 years of publishing. But that’s no reason to be deterred – they also publish new and emerging writers. If anything, the prospect of getting published alongside the names of such writers should serve as encouragement to get your writing into the magazine!