Concrete versus abstract description (tip 30) Reply

Concrete description is sensory description; it is the stuff we can touch, see, smell, hear, and taste. Abstract descriptions have no weight or texture. They are ideas, conditions, qualities, abstractions that float around in the ether. When and how should writers use these different types of description?

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How to write something original 2

Writers often complain that it’s hard to be original. Here’s how to write something that’s never been written before.

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Choosing relevant detail: writing, specificity, & Dan-Brown-isms 4

In our last video we discussed using specific details to make a story convincing. But specific details are not just there to make the story a bit more believable; they’re also the primary means through which the story, and all its emotion, is conveyed. So the details in your story can’t be any old details – unless you’re Dan Brown, the king of irrelevant details. Assuming you’re not Dan Brown, how do you make sure you choose the right details?

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How to lie and get away with it: a game for writers Reply

Writers are professional liars. We make things up but present those things in a way that’s sufficiently convincing that people believe us, or at least suspend their disbelief, for the time it takes them to read our books. So how does one lie and get away with it?

Would I lie to you gamecard
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Tell, don’t show Reply

One simple rule can sort even a serious ‘show, don’t tell’ obsession: so long as you’re dealing with objective facts, tell us those facts as simply and clearly as possible. You only need to make an effort to show rather than tell when you’re conveying subjective ideas.

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