Fundamental human journeys (tip 73) Reply

Michael Scott has written novels, films, and plays in a variety of genres for adults and children and teens. He’s learned that it doesn’t much matter what sort of story you’re writing, or for whom your writing it: “A good story is always a journey. It is about the people the hero meets along the way and how they change him or her.” Now that we’re thinking about the themes of stories, it becomes apparent that a character’s journey is inextricably bound with a story’s theme. And since the theme has to be something general and powerful, something universal and impactful, it’s not surprising that there aren’t that many journeys that really matter.

Have a look at this list of fundamental human journeys, and let me know in the comments whether there are any that I’ve missed:

Fundamental human journeys

Material

(simple transitions based on external changes – these are more likely to work in, say, a young adult genre novel than in a literary short story, but often in genre fiction a material transition will be made possible by a psychological transition)

Peril <-> Safety

Single <-> Married

Powerless <-> Powerful

Poor <-> Rich

Obscure <-> Famous

Picked on <-> Popular

Psychological

Not seizing the day <->  Seizing the day

Isolation <-> Human connection

Love <-> Loss

Despair <-> Hope

Obliviousness <-> Awareness of mortality

Innocence <-> Loss of innocence

Inhibition <-> Boldness

Desire <-> Contentment

Self-doubt <-> Self-acceptance

No sense of sublime <-> Sense of the sublime

Search for meaning <-> Accepting meaninglessness

Fear <-> Acceptance of death

Faith <-> Lack of faith

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