Creative Writers, free yourselves! Alternatives to the cinematic mode of narration (tip 62) 4

In the beginning, cinema took its inspiration from older forms of narrative including literature. But even in the 19th-century, realist writers were comparing their work to photography, and during the 20th-century many prose authors, including Wyndham Lewis and Christopher Isherwood, took inspiration from film. Published in 1960, John Updike’s present-tense novel Rabbit, Run was subtitled originally, “A Movie”, and he was explicit that “The present tense was in part meant to be an equivalent of the cinematic mode of narration.” From what I’ve seen, the cinematic mode of narration often dominates Creative Writing classrooms. But what is it? What are its limitations? And what are our alternatives?

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Featured Market: The Lampeter Review 1

This September, we decided to start a weekly Featured Market post. Each Wednesday, we’ll pinpoint a magazine, competition or anthology that we think you should pay attention to. We know it’s time consuming to trawl through the thousands of markets out there, find one that’s suitable for you, scan through their submission guidelines and then eventually submit; so we thought we’d do the hard work for you.

This week’s Featured Market is The Lampeter Review – TLR for short.

What’s great about TLR is that they’re a really high quality publication. Seriously, it looks amazing. They publish prose, poetry and plays from writers such as Joe Dunthorne, David Vann, Rachel Tresize, and many other household names, including Online Writing Tips very own Tyler Keevil & DD Johnston!

But they also publish new and emerging writers. And that’s why it’s brilliant. If you’re an unpublished writer, you have a great opportunity to be published alongside some established authors, in a beautifully compiled publication.

Take a look at their Submission Guidelines below:

One submission per issue, in one file, of the following:

Prose: no more than 3,000 words in length.

Poetry: either 3 short poems or 1 long poem.

Plays/Screenplays: 1 scene (10 pages max.)

Please also include a short bio (4 sentences max.)

If your work is accepted, please wait an issue before submitting again.

Have a look, read some previous issues, and get submitting!

Character generator trigger game 1

character generator trigger game-page-001We’re preparing a new section on characterisation, and to get us started, here’s a Character generator trigger game. This will either be a mildly distracting bit of fun or a psychologically traumatic journey into the darkness of your soul. From a writing perspective, let’s hope it’s the latter.

To begin with, imagine a character who wants whatever you think your mother or father (or guardian) always wanted but never, or hasn’t yet, obtained. Take a few minutes to think.

Intrigued? Click here for the full Character generator.

Good luck in therapy!

The 5 Fastest Responding Literary Magazines 3

We know what it’s like to get excited about submitting a short story in the hope that you’ll get a fast response. Weeks can go by, often months, with nothing.

WaitingI hate to be the one to break it to you, but with some magazines, there’s a chance you may never get a response at all.

But don’t panic. That’s what we’re here for. We’ve taken the time to create a list of 5 of the fastest responding literary magazines, so you can get your submission fix quicker than ever before!

All of these publications are part of Duotrope’s 25 fastest fiction markets.

1. Eunoia Review

The Eunoia Review are committed to publishing two new pieces of fiction every day. They aim to respond to all submissions within 24 hours. 

See their full submission guidelines here.

2. Hermeneutic Chaos Literary Journal

This journal have a turnaround time of 3 days for all submissions. They welcome fiction, poetry and other literary submissions by new, emerging and established authors. They’re primarily looking for experimental, hybrid and avant-garde literature.

See their full guidelines here.

3. After the Pause

This is the literary journal of a small press ‘a…p’, based in Indianapolis. They’re open to any type of submission, and they aim to respond to submissions within a week.

See their full guidelines here.

4. Bop Dead City

Bop Dead City is an independent, quarterly literary magazine seeking new writers with a story to tell. They accept fiction, poetry and artwork. According to Duotrope, their average response time is 2 days. 

See their full submission guidelines here.

5. One Throne Magazine

Founded in 2014, One Throne is an online literary magazine published quarterly. Their goal is to showcase the foremost of all creative writing, worldwide, in a single magazine.

According to Duotrope, their average response time is 3 days. 

So what are you waiting for? Get submitting! You won’t be waiting for long.

The image in this post is by Pedro Veneroso. It’s covered by a Creative Commons license and more of his work can be found here: https://www.flickr.com/photos/pfv/

Choosing your point of view: when to write in the first person (tip 40) Reply

Many of us begin writing in the first person, often without considering whether it’s the best point of view for our story. So here’s a link to a test that can help decide whether first person is right for you. And here, in the video below, you’ll find D.D. Johnston’s reflections on meeting Richard Ford, and on when writing in the first person is and isn’t a good idea.

read video transcript