Announcing the 2019 OWT Short Fiction Prize long list Reply

With almost 600 entries to consider, selecting our favourite 10% was never going to be easy. But the decisions this year have been especially difficult, as the standard of entries is the best we’ve ever seen. We’re thrilled to have attracted such a range of excellent fiction, sent to us from six continents. As always, we’re delighted that our long list features a mix of multi-published, award-winning authors and exciting new voices.

senja-profile (2)     Phil Bowne      dd johnston waterstones

 

Our judges this year are Senja Andrejevic-Bullock, Phil Bowne, and D.D. Johnston. Senja is a playwright, lecturer in dramatic writing, and also a widely published author of short fiction. Phil is a television and fiction writer for The Wombles – a forthcoming children’s TV show and book series – whose first novel Cows Can’t Jump was recently awarded the Spotlight First Novel Prize. He’s represented by the SP Agency and his short fiction has been published in the UK, US and Canada.  D.D. Johnston is a Senior Lecturer in Creative Writing at the University of Gloucestershrie and the author of three novels.

We’ve picked a longlist of 60, but we could have picked any of several hundred high-quality stories, so commiserations to those who didn’t make the cut this time. These decisions are subjective, and luck plays a big part too; it always seems to me that if the previous story made the list then the next story up for consideration is at a disadvantage. You need a lot of skill to be placed in a writing comp, but you need a bit of luck too. In that way, I guess writing comps are more like poker than chess.

Anyway, congratulations to the following authors, listed in alphabetical order by surname. Next up, we’ll be narrowing this esteemed field down to a shortlist of 12, which we’ll publish on this website on Monday 15th July.

Penelope Aaron
Matthew Alberswerth
Eunice M. Amero
Nana Adwoa Amponsah-Mensah
Colleen Anderson
L.Shapley Bassen
Stanley Bloom
Kim Botly
Gina Burgess
Jeff Bakkensen
Laura J. Campbell
Elinor Clark
Paul B. Cohen
Bryan Costales
Elizabeth Edelglass
Elizabeth Edwards
Jann Everard
Maria Garcia
Joe Giordano
Isobel Granby
Atar J Hadari
Andrew Hanson
Mohammed Hidhayat
Beatrice Hughes
Mina Ivosev
D.M. Kerr
Yancy Lael
Monique Lennon
Scott Levy
Vivian Li
Gargi Mehra
Jennifer Moore
Hillard Morley
Samantha Louise Nepomuceno
Carolin Neupert
Frances Ogamba
Godsent Okere
Daniel Paton
Darya Protopopova
Emma Pickering
Celine Piser
Amanda Poythress
Jeffrey G. Roberts
Joshua Sastre
R. A. Savary
Jay Seate
Elena Sichrovsky
C.L. Spillard
Nick Sweeney
Indrani Talukdar
Mike Todd
Matias Travieso-Diaz
Alexander Xavier Urpí
Lili Vaskó
Christine Venzon
Yuliia Vereta
Hannah Whiteoak
Megan Wildhood
Janine Mick Wills
Lorna Wood
Noemi Yanko

Top tips for submitting short stories (video tip 49) Reply

Are you sending out short stories without as much success as you’d like? In an Online Writing Tips video debut, short story writer Philip Bowne offers some tips on submitting – from looking overseas to using Duotrope.

The thumbnail for this video uses a photo by Flood G. It’s covered by a Creative Commons License, and you can find more of her work here.

Five tips for studying Creative Writing 2

Heading off to start a Creative Writing degree this September? Lucky you. If you’re wondering what to expect, here are some tips from Philip Bowne, who has just finished his degree in Creative Writing, and D.D. Johnston, who has taught Creative Writing at the University of Gloucestershire since 2010.

Phil BownePhil: Studying Creative Writing has been worthwhile for me in so many ways. The lecturers and the course itself helped me to get my work published in magazines and anthologies, work for a month as a travel writer, and gain the confidence to read my own writing out on stage. But in my first year, I wasn’t so sure how to go about studying Creative Writing. I wasn’t even sure I was capable of doing it.
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The 5 Fastest Responding Literary Magazines 3

We know what it’s like to get excited about submitting a short story in the hope that you’ll get a fast response. Weeks can go by, often months, with nothing.

WaitingI hate to be the one to break it to you, but with some magazines, there’s a chance you may never get a response at all.

But don’t panic. That’s what we’re here for. We’ve taken the time to create a list of 5 of the fastest responding literary magazines, so you can get your submission fix quicker than ever before!

All of these publications are part of Duotrope’s 25 fastest fiction markets.

1. Eunoia Review

The Eunoia Review are committed to publishing two new pieces of fiction every day. They aim to respond to all submissions within 24 hours. 

See their full submission guidelines here.

2. Hermeneutic Chaos Literary Journal

This journal have a turnaround time of 3 days for all submissions. They welcome fiction, poetry and other literary submissions by new, emerging and established authors. They’re primarily looking for experimental, hybrid and avant-garde literature.

See their full guidelines here.

3. After the Pause

This is the literary journal of a small press ‘a…p’, based in Indianapolis. They’re open to any type of submission, and they aim to respond to submissions within a week.

See their full guidelines here.

4. Bop Dead City

Bop Dead City is an independent, quarterly literary magazine seeking new writers with a story to tell. They accept fiction, poetry and artwork. According to Duotrope, their average response time is 2 days. 

See their full submission guidelines here.

5. One Throne Magazine

Founded in 2014, One Throne is an online literary magazine published quarterly. Their goal is to showcase the foremost of all creative writing, worldwide, in a single magazine.

According to Duotrope, their average response time is 3 days. 

So what are you waiting for? Get submitting! You won’t be waiting for long.

The image in this post is by Pedro Veneroso. It’s covered by a Creative Commons license and more of his work can be found here: https://www.flickr.com/photos/pfv/

Our Top 5 Tips for Submitting Short Stories 3

Phil BowneHere’s an Online Writing Tips debut: these tips for submitting stories are brought to you by the newest member of our team, the very talented Philip Bowne. Phil’s short fiction has been published by The Lampeter Review, Sein und Werden,and Birkbeck University’s Writers’ Hub. His short story ‘Cows Can’t Jump’ was selected as one of ten winners of the Stroud Short Stories competition. In the US, he won the Bartleby Snopes short fiction competition, and his work has also appeared in WORK, Gravel, BlazeVOX, Atticus Review, and the Maple Tree Literary Supplement, in Canada. He has also worked as a travel writer, and his non-fiction has appeared in The Guardian. Phil’s tips will be just the thing if you’re thinking of entering the inaugural Online Writing Tips short fiction prize.

So you’ve polished a short story and you feel it’s ready to be published to the masses. Brilliant news! You may feel you are only an e-mail away from having your story in Granta, The New York Times, or The Paris Review…  Sadly, it’s not quite that easy. Here are our top 5 tips for submitting to magazines and publications in short fiction markets.

1. You’re a reject

I don’t mean that in a horrible way. We’re all rejects. I’ve had hundreds of stories rejected, and only a handful published. At first, it hurts. After the tenth, twentieth, thirtieth rejection, you’ll get used to it. Even the household names will have been rejected hundreds of times.

Being able to accept rejection is an important trait to have as a writer, as you’ll spend most of your time being rejected… Sounds fun, right? What that does mean, is that when you do get an acceptance letter (which you will!) it feels incredible!

So don’t lose hope! Here at Online Writing Tips, we remember the words of Gordon Lish whenever we question our cause:

‘I see the notion of talent as quite irrelevant. I see instead perseverance, application, industry, assiduity, will, will, will, desire, desire, desire.’

2. Follow Standard Manuscript Formatting

This is a must. Editors receive hundreds of stories that they must whittle down to only a handful. Not following the correct formatting guidelines will give them a reason to throw your work into the slush pile before they’ve even read it! We will provide a tutorial on SMF so you’ll never trip up on your formatting again.

3. Keep cover letters short and informative – but try to catch the editor’s attention.

In my experience, a cover letter that briefly introduces the author, the story and its themes will make for a good cover letter – particularly if you can hook the judge or editor with a snappy description of the story that makes them want to read it. Every editor/judge is different though, and so any advice we offer will not apply for every magazine or journal! A polite tone that shows you appreciate them taking the time to read your work will always set you up in the right way.

4. Use Submittable!

Submittable is a great platform for submitting. It allows you to monitor the progress of your submissions, and stores your biography, e-mail and story titles all on your profile. Duotrope is another very useful resource, but different in that it is a database of all the markets you can submit to. It’s great for finding out the fastest responding markets (so you don’t have to wait a year for a decision) or highest paying markets (so you can dream of the big money prizes…)

5. Don’t assume you’re limited to your national market. 

The best thing I ever did when submitting to short fiction markets was look outside of the UK. In America and Canada there are hundreds more markets than we have here in the UK, so your chances of publication are much greater. It also looks great to have a record of publishing outside of your own country. Again, Duotrope is one of the best places to seek out these international markets. It’s not a free service, but if you have a few stories to submit, it’s well worth the subscription fee.

If you’re reading this and thinking of submitting a short story, look no further than Online Writing Tips!

The Short Fiction Prize is OPEN and the deadline is February 1st 2016. The talented winner will take home £150 PLUS publication here on the website. Get submitting!