Free writing critique: The Ill-Made Witch by Mandy Keene 3

Many thanks to Mandy Keene who has sent us an excerpt from her novel, The Ill-Made Witch. We’ll leave this post live for a week, during which time we’ll welcome any constructive comments. At the end of the week, the author will receive a free critique from one of our writing tutors. (If you’d like to share your work for critique, please see here for all the necessary information.)

Extract

Chapter 1


Mattie hated hospital food.

Today it was bread that was older than she was. She had no appetite, but all her movements were being watched. Everything, from the beeping of the pulse monitor to each sentence she said. But there was no point complaining to anyone. She could almost hear their replies: “Well, you landed yourself here.” More…

Free writing critique: ‘Watching Bees’ by MD Commerford 6

Many thanks to MD Commerford who has sent us an excerpt from his story, ‘Watching Bees’. We’ll leave this post live for a week, during which time we’ll welcome any constructive comments. At the end of the week, the author will receive a free critique from one of our writing tutors. (If you’d like to share your work for critique, please see here for all the necessary information.)

MD commerfordMD Commerford is a mature student who has spent the last six years studying for an English Literature degree with the Open University. Having caught the creative writing bug, he’s just started an MA in English with a focus on creative writing at the University of Hull. He has written several short stories under the name MD Wilder, contributed to various blogs, and entered several poetry and fiction competitions. He enjoys the craft of writing and is constantly looking for feedback that can help him improve. You can find him on Facebook at www.facebook.com/wilderwrites and he tweets at @thewilderwrites

Watching Bees is a 3000-word piece of fictionalised life writing aimed at adults. Here’s an extract – feedback welcome!

Watching Bees

I am over my mother’s knee. So close I can smell her Opium even though my nose is clogged with snot. Tears are blurring the floral print of her summer dress. I am wailing my unintelligible apologies over and over into fabric. She is using a hard soled Scholl shoe. It is her favourite instrument to beat me with. Each clap exploding on each word as she repeated that: Children. Should. Honour. Their. Father. And. Mother
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Five tips for studying Creative Writing 2

Heading off to start a Creative Writing degree this September? Lucky you. If you’re wondering what to expect, here are some tips from Philip Bowne, who has just finished his degree in Creative Writing, and D.D. Johnston, who has taught Creative Writing at the University of Gloucestershire since 2010.

Phil BownePhil: Studying Creative Writing has been worthwhile for me in so many ways. The lecturers and the course itself helped me to get my work published in magazines and anthologies, work for a month as a travel writer, and gain the confidence to read my own writing out on stage. But in my first year, I wasn’t so sure how to go about studying Creative Writing. I wasn’t even sure I was capable of doing it.
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Free writing critique service launching this September! 3

Want a free manuscript critique worth a market value of approximately $100? Here’s how it works!

online writing tips logoAt OnlineWritingTips, we’re following the writers’ workshop model that was developed at the University of Iowa in the 1930s, and which is used at universities and writers’ groups around the world. We’ll post an extract of your work publicly and encourage responses from our users (we’ll block anything that isn’t constructive). Then, at the end of the week, you’ll receive feedback from an experienced writing teacher and published novelist. Your work can appear anonymously, or with your name, writer’s bio, and links to your social media. And it’s all completely free!

If you’re interested, you can find out more here. We look forward to reading your work!

A few things every prose writer needs Reply

A recent poll revealed that among respondents over fifty, ‘publish a novel’ has displaced ‘have an extra-marital affair’ as the most cited ambition. Perhaps so many people aspire to write because all you need to get started is a pen and paper or something to type on. But there are a few other things that might help you along the way.


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